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Yet another college torrenting problem
25-02-2012, 12:29 AM
Post: #1
Yet another college torrenting problem
So I'm going to college about 2000 miles away from home and apparently we can't torrent stuff here (figures) and if we do, we supposedly get our internet taken away. This does not bode well for me.

Basically, I need to torrent some shows. What is the best way to get around this "no torrenting" rule?

Some more info: I live in a large dorm building where each room has its own wifi and the only time you use the network wifi is if you're down on the second floor in one of the lounges or the cafeteria.

Solutions I've considered so far: Proxy server (but does that really work? It seems too easy), direct download (but that requires a LOT of un-rar-ing and that shit's just annoying), someone told me to use utorrent (which I already had) but then I read that someone else got caught using utorrent so I'm confused there, and then the oddest suggestion I've received is that while I'm torrenting the episodes, I should just put the "priority" of each one on "low" and that this will help because it won't take up as much bandwidth (O_o).

So please, what is the best way to get around this rule? I read something about "Ports" or something but I have never heard of them before. <---is not particularly computer savvy, but hey, that's why I'm here.
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25-02-2012, 08:15 PM
Post: #2
RE: Yet another college torrenting problem
What encryption do these other WiFi routers use and who sets them up? Do you know how they're linked up? Do they all go back to the same place, I can't see them having a 100 or so different networks.


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25-02-2012, 08:46 PM
Post: #3
RE: Yet another college torrenting problem
(25-02-2012 08:15 PM)Mark Wrote:  What encryption do these other WiFi routers use and who sets them up? Do you know how they're linked up? Do they all go back to the same place, I can't see them having a 100 or so different networks.

You pretty much have to bring your own router. The only thing they provide is an outlet. I'm pretty sure they all go back to the same place though.:l
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25-02-2012, 08:54 PM
Post: #4
RE: Yet another college torrenting problem
I'd love to work on the tech side in one of those places to see how they're actually set up.
If Bob bring router a (a netgear) which will be 192.168.1.1 and steve who brings router b (a belkin) which will be 192.168.2.1 both giving out DHCP addresses.. this is getting to get messy quickly.


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06-03-2012, 01:04 AM (This post was last modified: 06-03-2012 01:06 AM by manikertamang.)
Post: #5
RE: Yet another college torrenting problem
Usually educational institutions use a Class A 10.x.x.x IP configuration for within their infrastructure which will allow for 2^24 = 16777216 IP addresses to be allocated. This is a generic example and that number can be much higher depending on the subnet mask that is used. It matters not if every individual person uses a linksys (just an example) router which creates a LAN segment IP scheme of 192.168.x.x. behind (on your computer's side) the router. The WAN IP of the linksys is still going to be a 10.x.x.x number. Regarding the torrents though, if you are using winblows and utorrent there are a few things which can help you stay under the radar. First off download PeerBlock which will block the IP addresses of 99.99% of the anti peer to peer agencies that are lurking around every corner. Make sure not to enable the educational blocklist seeing as that it will probably disallow your internet connection while you are running it. These Ap2p agencies will email your network admin and the network admin will then track the download back to you. Within uTorrent itself there are a few things you can do. Set the download and upload limits to a low number as in probably no more 25kB/sec per torrent and no more than 100kB/sec TOTAL. You also would be best served to allow ONLY encrypted connections so if the network admin is running NTOP they won't be able to read the header of the torrent files that your are seeding or leeching. Setting priority on a particular download only has an impact if you are sharing/downloading multiple files at the same time, if you only have one download even if it is marked with low priority it is still going to use the most bandwidth that it can seeing as that it is the only job that uTorrent has to be concerned with. Although it will take a lot longer to finish getting your files, if you are eating up low bandwidth on the network, encrypting all of your connections, and blocking all the fuck heads that are trying to track the download of copyrighted materials you should be fine. Pack3t has spoken, have a nice day.

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23-05-2012, 08:29 AM
Post: #6
RE: Yet another college torrenting problem
Try using secure encrypted SSH tunnels, it comes with PirateRay , for example, the connection is anonymous with no bandwidth limit. But costs $ 4.9/month, at least you can try for free 1 week.
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